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10 Signs You are an Alcoholic

Do you know if you are an alcoholic? Have people told you you need to stop drinking? Have you hurt someone while drunk? If so then open this up! Even if you are not an alcoholic open it up anyway and share this with friends and family that might be alcoholics. After all it could save someone’s life.

  1. After work you go down to the bar to have a mere 3 beers. But if you get there early you say you might as well have an extra one.

  2. Your son or daughter has gotten hurt after you got home from a party or a night drinking.
  3. You have had 2 or more DUI’s.
  4. You can’t remember the last time you had a soda or water instead of a beer at a restaurant.
  5. You have five or more different types of beer in the fridge at all times, and you refill the fridge every few weeks.
  6. You have called in sick to work multiple times because of a hangover.
  7. People laugh at you and say you have done some crazy things. When you have no idea what they are talking about.
  8. Someone has told you multiple times to cut down on the alcohol consumption, and you tell them “I can stop whenever I want”.
  9. You say you drink because you are “bored”.
  10. You opened up this article thinking “Hmm lets see If I am an alcoholic, like all my friends think I am”.

My friends, If 5 or more of these things relates to you then you are probably an alcoholic. I bet if you are an alcoholic you probably already no it. There are ways to stop If you want:

  1. Have some friends that you trust take all the beer out of your refrigerator.
  2. When you go to a bar or restaurant don’t go alone. So you can cut down maybe a beer or two to start, and have a soda instead. Your friend could remind you if you forget. That’s what friends are for. To help you in times like this.
  3. Also, listen to someone when they tell you that you have a problem, because they are probably trying to help.
  4. Tell your kids to not end up like you and teach them what being an alcoholic can do to you.
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  1. You might want to have an adult re-write that article if you want someone to take it seriously.

  2. I’m not sure if this is supposed to be serious or not.

  3. I second TMW. Ghey.

  4. HA!! This has got to be the largest JOKE ever!! “2 or more DUI’s?!?!?!?!” ARE YOU SERIOUS. You my friend have just wasted your time. But I will drink one for you while I shoot for my 4th DUI.

  5. not all alcoholics have those symptoms…. some are quiet, stay at home, and still do every day tasks…but in my case my friend uses the excuses that i am really thirsty and beer is the only thing that quenches my thirst or….im not an alcoholic i just like the taste of beer!

  6. Ben, if you lived in a small town with three or so local beers, you’d realize that about 50% of the locals have at least 1 DUI, and about 10% have 2 or more. That doesn’t make them alcoholics though, they’re just unlucky and don’t know their limit or how to drink.

  7. ** I meant local bars, not beers.

  8. i have never had a dui. i only drink if i am at home. which is every night. I cant stop, i have tried. my weekends are drink feast and work nights are 3 to 4 a night. ( so I dont smell like alcohol the next day) on work nights i will eat almost cooked pasta or rice to soak up the alcohol before the next day. I am a closet drinker. so no friends, no one comes over and no one knows at work either. I am not lonely because I would rather drink than have any one in my life. I have not hurt any one because i dont let people that far into my personal life.

  9. Please heed my advise, I am the wife of an alcholic. I would run infront of a moving train for this man, and he can’t put down a beer bottle for me. I’m not nieve, I know he “cant help it”, but on the receiving end of the druken rages, the pissing yourself, the constant dissapointment, please stop!! I will never leave my husband in this place, but I’m loosing myself along with him. There is a time and place for fun, but if this what life is? Are we so small that we are imcapable of dealing with issues? Arn’t we not supossed to strive for better? Life is about people. Life is about relationship. If your drunk all the time, your missing out on the love that you would receive. You may think that life is so boring, unimportant, and stupid, but under the stuper, there is love. LOVE!!! Try learning to forgive yourself, and forgive all the horrible things that people have done, love…….

  10. I am the sister of an alcoholic he drinks everyday is also about to lose his wife and stepdaughter i am surprised they have stuck with him that long he has gotton 3 duis and his last one he did time in prison a year and half he is hurting everyone around him i hope he is able to see that before its too late.

  11. and also how old r u ben u must be atleast 17 cuz by the way it sounds that ur maturity level

  12. actualy i was 15 when i wrote this, jus wanted to possibly help people, i dont really know, father used to work at a bar so i saw this stuff a lot

  13. I initially did not know if I was an alcoholic but I’ve come to terms with it now. If you are having a problem identifying yourself as such, here are just a few tell-tell signs.
    -If you ever made a Christmas tree with empty beer cans… you might be an alcoholic.
    -If you ever shot a skyrocket out of your rectum… you might be an alcoholic.
    -If you named your son “Miller Lite”… you might be an alcoholic.
    -If you ever rooted for The “Oakland Raiders”… you could be an alcoholic.
    -If you ever got a DUI on a riding lawn mower… you might be an alcoholic.
    Please feel free to add your own.

  14. I am the wife of a “Im not an alcoholic”. It’s not a good place to be, I am a pastor, a youth leader, a womens ministry leader, I am the only one financially, emotionaly, physically supporting my household of 6. Where do you turn, I love my husband, I believe in my God, I pray every day that I will pass this trial..but like the wife before me, I am losing myself.. I used to be beautiful, inside and outside, now I am tired, lonely, broke, almost homeless, how do I look for a better tomorrow, with a heat so emotionally beat down that I can’t even stand to look at myself in the mirror.. Please if your loved ones have continually asked you to not drink tonight…think about them for once rather that yourself as usual… Broken bones and bruises heal…heartache is something altogether different

  15. If you suspect (or know) that you are an alcoholic:
    1) Reducing your drinking is not enough. You have to eliminate it completely. “One is too many, a thousand is never enough.”
    2) Avoid people, places, and things that might tempt you to drink, eg parties where alcohol is served, buddies you usually drink with, etc…
    3) Get help. Find an AA meeting near you or admit yourself to a rehab center. There are free rehabs out there if you can’t afford one.
    4) Keep in mind that alcoholism is a chronic disease (like diabetes for example.) This means that you can’t tell yourself you no longer have a problem because you’ve been clean for a few years. That will lead to a relapse.
    5) Last but not least, you may relapse. Don’t let it keep you down. Dust yourself off and give it another shot.

    Hope this helps, all.

  16. What a joke! Do you have any idea buddy what you are on about, and let me give you a pointer obviously not. Yes, you may be trying to help but reading what’s written you have not experienced it at all. Wicked_grey is right on track, my hat off to you as you have either experienced first hand or been very close to someone who has. People do not understand people who are alcoholics not even their own family as much as we try to say we do. I lost my Dad 2 years ago due to alcohol and it still hurts deeply and oh what a waste of a life a good life. But yes it is a disease but most of us look at it as a smelly dirty old person who just won’t help themselves yet all they are after is a chat and a friendly smile and someone to stick beside them. But oh how hard it is when they don’t wish to help themselves and you basically see somebody slowly killing themselves. My Dad was a great Dad even to the very end I just couldn’t get him to stop. That was the hardest part and then knowing the day that I couldn’t find him that it was over, I just hope he gave himself up to soberiety before he went on to a better place. I just wish daily that he was still here. Love you Dad and miss you heaps. xxxx

  17. Living with an alcoholic is like being on a roller coaster that never stops one day your up high and he’s happy cause he is drunk then you hit the low spots when he is either sober looking for alcohol or been on a bender and is abusive and angry and all you want is for the roller coaster to stop and for there to be no highs and lows just one constant speed.

  18. Alcoholics don’t admit they are alcoholics….. first step=denial!
    If you are dependent on alcohol to make you feel better….. even if it is 1-4/ week — you are an alcoholic!

  19. dear writer – I’m a 38 year old beautiful girl that has a great career but has gone through a number of heart aches. Just 30 days ago I gave up drinking. I finally got a clue that I “might” have a problem. That just maybe I was escaping into a fantasy world of personal destruction which was why I could not carry on an intimate relationship. Tonight I wanted to drink – I came across this site just before giving in. You made a difference in my life simply because you tried. Your writing may not be perfect but it was perfect for me tonight. One more day…

  20. This is an awful ‘article’. This is exactly why so many alcoholics keep denying what they are- because someone without half a brain puts all these ridiculous ’signs of alcoholism’ into a box. So I can bet that you have enabled at least one alcoholic to keep saying for another year that they don’t have a problem bc their symptoms don’t fit into this little box. Please add a disclaimer or say that all alcoholic don’t have the same symptoms. There are binge drinkers who are alcoholics that function very well at work, but are still alcoholics. Please don’t make it any harder on those of us who have to live with them and try to convince them of their problems. Do some research and try spell check next time.

  21. I do agree with … , why is it that alcohol is legal and not marijuana? do u see people that are high get into a rage that hurts loved ones? if so that is rare and sad. Marijuana calms people dosn’t make them get out of control and hit their wife or kids.. its sad. Alcohol is the devil and weed makes you lay back and chill out..granted it makes people lazy but id rather have my son a stoner then an alcoholic

  22. I have been drinking since I was 12 years old. I couldn’t imagine what life wil be like without booze. I am a 35 year old woman. 2 weeks ago i was hammered, tripped and smashed my head on a huge rock next to the fire. I could have died. I have a nice scar on my head and cracked 2 teeth. You would think that wuould have been a eye opener.. OOOhhhhh no, I got drunk a week later. I am a drunk. Sucks but true. Now I have to deal with it.

  23. The anwser for me and countless others was AA, sober for two years…..and for family members that struggled living with me there was Alanon and families anonymous to help with there hurt and anger. Jst thought I would throw that out there :)

  24. Although your some of your info may be a little off i believe that you have the right idea and you have probably helped more people than you relize. I am going through a situation now because of drinking; i never relized how mean i got after getting drunk but obviously i am pretty mean. the women that i love and that loves me is now in tears because of the things that i said and i am praying that things get better but that is in gods hands now. This has prompted me to quit drinking completely, she means way more to me than any beer.

  25. there is a reason it\’s forbidden is islam.

  26. I am an alocoholic and a coke head (for almost two years now, and pretty much everyday)… I do coke during the day and into the night and I drink alcohol to counter the coke effect. Then I drink some more to get drunk and ‘come down’ off the coke high and to get some sleep. I am married, have a full time job and nobody has a vlue!! I am in need of help and CAN NOT tell my husband… nor can I tell my family or friends as my husband will find out. I seriously want to stop both, but I don’t know where to start. I’ve tried to stop buying coke but I argue with myself and then break down and buy it again, telling myself that it will be the last time… so in turn I end up buying another mickey to help me come down from the high… and so on and so on….
    I am an idiot, yes I know this… I need to figure out how to stop, without my husband finding out.

  27. Silliest ten signs for alcoholism that I have ever read.

  28. Addiction/alcoholism is one of the trickiest things for a sufferer to perceive in themselves until it really is a problem of some size in their life that they can recognize as a problem. Sometimes that can be past some sort of point of no return if the person cannot fight back against the addiction anymore. I’ve seen that in my family. It’s not like a disease that you can get a test for or answer a couple of simple/stupid questions, which seem to implicate many more people that really don’t, from my point of view, have the same problem with drugs/alcohol/whatever that I have. My personality got distorted and my brain changed or something: taken over by some other part of myself. The little angel on one shoulder gave up the the little devil had it’s way with me. Somebody else was driving the bus and I was just a passenger watching where my life was going passively; I had started to loose control over my life incrementally. But wherever I went the habits were always there. I couldn’t escape them or leave them behind. It became ‘what I do’. A defining part of who I was and still is really. I just choose not to; I’m back in the driver’s seat of the same bus. Much of my addiction was a secret to some extent, usually from those who really care about me; even from my drinking and pot smoking buddies. Shame was part of the cycle I had. And I couldn’t imagine life without booze or pot. ‘Without it’ seemed an empty place; boring, cold, dull, less interesting, less fun, almost scary, unbearable, intolerable: impossible!. Whatever else was happening in my life somehow ‘it’ was always there too. Little holidays forced upon me, days off and away for my comfort substances, turned into rewards later, usually with a good session. It became a creeping realization full of fear, denial, little internal battles that I constantly lost and then the surrender slow or fast, back to booze or weed or both. Oblivion; get me outta here! Most of the time I kidded myself I was enjoying my habit or just plain hated it but couldn’t stop. (Recognize the tobacco smokers’ addiction in that last description? It’s much easier to spot because it’s an addiction that’s out in the open and still tolerated although to a lesser extent these days. Soon the social shame of tobacco smoking will push even the most adamant smokers into the shadows to hide their addiction) And I use the word ’sufferer’ because it is a self induced disease: we do it to ourselves until the habit slowly turns into an addiction; a physical and mental cage we cannot get back out of, most often to escape something in our lives; bored moments/crap job/psychic wounds/memories/etc., etc. Interestingly tobacco smokers easily recognize smoking as an addiction that eventually causes all sorts of diseases without recognizing the addiction to the tobacco as part of the diseases caused by the ‘habit’. Ever heard a smoker who said they’d like to quit or seems ashamed or controlled by their habit but can’t seem to just stop? They always give in again once they’ve had a pint or a glass of wine or have a bad day. That’s addiction. For me, I came to realize I had addiction problems when, after almost 30 years of smoking pot and drinking (I got into pot before booze), that I could no longer control any of the habits I had developed with these two drugs(and I had tried many other drugs along the way), despite wanting to change; be the person I wanted to be for my wife and family. There was this other person who ‘I really was’ once I got round to all those good things I was going to do while I was just sitting looking out the window of the bus; and slowly falling into a pit of self hate mixed with pity because I couldn’t take control of my life. Pity’s a funny one: it’s a sort of excuse to keep on using. I just couldn’t seem to get off that bus and I hated myself for spiraling into the asshole I didn’t want to be and not being able to have the respect for my own life and body and the lives of my wife and family. Once it spiraled really hard into a deep depression (not for the first time) and I was having suicidal thoughts, I went to a doctor for what I thought was just a deep clinical depression. After seeing GP’s, therapists and psychologists I was gently guided to see a substance abuse counsellor. I say it that way because I really couldn’t see the problem but they could. You really have to recognize and admit it to yourself; you can’t just be told, that doesn’t seem to work. The addiction will not let you hear it from the outside. The little devil really filters out all the stuff your addicted self needs to hear but can’t. I really thought I was just ‘down’ and that the drink and pot was my ’self medication’. I had a doctor’s recommendation for pot so it was my official and legal medicine. Once I got to the point of admitting my substance problems out loud to myself and to another human in the safe and understanding office of my counsellor, a hugh burden seemed to lift off my shoulders. It was such a relief to finally get honest with myself and take the first step to sobriety. It felt like I discovered there was hope in the world after a long dark journey. It’s not easy and the glib questions at the start of this article only serve to prod a person near their ‘bottom’ to start looking inward and hopefully find the courage to be honest; really honest with themselves. I prepared myself physically and mentally for the struggle to get clean and sober. And then I did it! Just like that, I stopped. And that part is not easy either. It was a frightening leap of faith, leaving a whole part of me behind and I wasn’t sure what I would find of myself; who I really was. I had to face up to myself with no place to hide. What I would recognize as myself? That’s just the beginning and really the easiest part. The struggle is to stay clean and sober and the best way is to get into AA or MA or any program with other recovering addicts. It really really helps. I believe many people are like me (because I know plenty of them) who struggle with a sort of mix of addictions. People don’t think pot is addictive but when mixed with an addiction to alcohol it can seem like the lesser of the two evils but the result of a wasted life is much the same as other addictions. Although instead of OD’ing you’re life just winds down into this blank haze inside your brain. Like I say, I was beginning to think of suicide as the amount of booze I was consuming kept increasing to fully ‘wipe my slate’ each day. In many respects I would say the physical part of the addiction is the simplest part to deal with if more obviously uncomfortable. Luckily the physical withdrawal for pot is not so severe, but still real. And my alcohol withdrawal also was not as severe as dedicated booze hounds (I didn’t drink much hard booze, a lot of beer and wine topped off with a shot or two to put the icing on the cake, that seemed to make a difference) For me, one led to the other or filled in for the other while I waited to complete the high with both. But I could not control either. That was the hardest part for me to admit to myself. Pot is more insipid in a way because it’s thought of as a herb, a medicine while booze has an obvious history of wreckage in the world to look at. once you recognize pot as an addictive substance like anything else you can start to spot it’s victims though. I live in Northern CA and the mystique and quality of weed is legendary with good reason. I hope to never drink or smoke weed again and I keep on the straight and narrow because if I look back on the hollow, shallow, self centered jerk I had become I shudder. I’ve lost many good friends through these last years as I descended lower; I was not a social alcoholic and basically lost touch and ignored most of my life which I am working to regain through a process of humility and apology and honesty. Also not easy. And I am gaining my self respect and health back through the process and my life feels so much better and my relationships are getting back on track and in focus. I still struggle but I’m determined not to turn back now I’ve broken the chains, this time for good. If some of what I say resonates with you then look inside and be honest with yourself and shut out all the idiots who detract and distract you from the process with their put downs for either pot or booze issues. Get some help if you find you can’t control your habits; there is no shame in asking for help. On the contrary, you will find hope and humility which can lead you back (or perhaps for the first time) to a real simple pure joy. It feels weird at first to say these things about yourself but quickly it becomes a liberating experience. There is a real simple joy in being alive. I had forgotten about it. You can do it too. Oh yes you can! If I can pull out of it, after thirty years slowly spiraling into a haze of despair disguised as enjoyment, you can too. Be honest and seek help if you can’t do it yourself, you will find the strength in yourself you need with the help of others. Just take that first step…go on…

  29. Addiction/alcoholism is one of the trickiest things for a sufferer to perceive in themselves until it really is a problem of some size in their life that they can recognize as a problem. Sometimes that can be past some sort of point of no return if the person cannot fight back against the addiction anymore. I\’ve seen that in my family. It\’s not like a disease that you can get a test for or answer a couple of simple/stupid questions, which seem to implicate many more people that really don\’t, from my point of view, have the same problem with drugs/alcohol/whatever that I have. My personality got distorted and my brain changed or something: taken over by some other part of myself. The little angel on one shoulder gave up the the little devil had it\’s way with me. Somebody else was driving the bus and I was just a passenger watching where my life was going passively; I had started to loose control over my life incrementally. But wherever I went the habits were always there. I couldn\’t escape them or leave them behind. It became \’what I do\’. A defining part of who I was and still is really. I just choose not to; I\’m back in the driver\’s seat of the same bus. Much of my addiction was a secret to some extent, usually from those who really care about me; even from my drinking and pot smoking buddies. Shame was part of the cycle I had. And I couldn\’t imagine life without booze or pot. \’Without it\’ seemed an empty place; boring, cold, dull, less interesting, less fun, almost scary, unbearable, intolerable: impossible!. Whatever else was happening in my life somehow \’it\’ was always there too. Little holidays forced upon me, days off and away for my comfort substances, turned into rewards later, usually with a good session. It became a creeping realization full of fear, denial, little internal battles that I constantly lost and then the surrender slow or fast, back to booze or weed or both. Oblivion; get me outta here! Most of the time I kidded myself I was enjoying my habit or just plain hated it but couldn\’t stop. (Recognize the tobacco smokers\’ addiction in that last description? It\’s much easier to spot because it\’s an addiction that\’s out in the open and still tolerated although to a lesser extent these days. Soon the social shame of tobacco smoking will push even the most adamant smokers into the shadows to hide their addiction) And I use the word \’sufferer\’ because it is a self induced disease: we do it to ourselves until the habit slowly turns into an addiction; a physical and mental cage we cannot get back out of, most often to escape something in our lives; bored moments/crap job/psychic wounds/memories/etc., etc. Interestingly tobacco smokers easily recognize smoking as an addiction that eventually causes all sorts of diseases without recognizing the addiction to the tobacco as part of the diseases caused by the \’habit\’. Ever heard a smoker who said they\’d like to quit or seems ashamed or controlled by their habit but can\’t seem to just stop? They always give in again once they\’ve had a pint or a glass of wine or have a bad day. That\’s addiction. For me, I came to realize I had addiction problems when, after almost 30 years of smoking pot and drinking (I got into pot before booze), that I could no longer control any of the habits I had developed with these two drugs(and I had tried many other drugs along the way), despite wanting to change; be the person I wanted to be for my wife and family. There was this other person who \’I really was\’ once I got round to all those good things I was going to do while I was just sitting looking out the window of the bus; and slowly falling into a pit of self hate mixed with pity because I couldn\’t take control of my life. Pity\’s a funny one: it\’s a sort of excuse to keep on using. I just couldn\’t seem to get off that bus and I hated myself for spiraling into the asshole I didn\’t want to be and not being able to have the respect for my own life and body and the lives of my wife and family. Once it spiraled really hard into a deep depression (not for the first time) and I was having suicidal thoughts, I went to a doctor for what I thought was just a deep clinical depression. After seeing GP\’s, therapists and psychologists I was gently guided to see a substance abuse counsellor. I say it that way because I really couldn\’t see the problem but they could. You really have to recognize and admit it to yourself; you can\’t just be told, that doesn\’t seem to work. The addiction will not let you hear it from the outside. The little devil really filters out all the stuff your addicted self needs to hear but can\’t. I really thought I was just \’down\’ and that the drink and pot was my \’self medication\’. I had a doctor\’s recommendation for pot so it was my official and legal medicine. Once I got to the point of admitting my substance problems out loud to myself and to another human in the safe and understanding office of my counsellor, a hugh burden seemed to lift off my shoulders. It was such a relief to finally get honest with myself and take the first step to sobriety. It felt like I discovered there was hope in the world after a long dark journey. It\’s not easy and the glib questions at the start of this article only serve to prod a person near their \’bottom\’ to start looking inward and hopefully find the courage to be honest; really honest with themselves. I prepared myself physically and mentally for the struggle to get clean and sober. And then I did it! Just like that, I stopped. And that part is not easy either. It was a frightening leap of faith, leaving a whole part of me behind and I wasn\’t sure what I would find of myself; who I really was. I had to face up to myself with no place to hide. What I would recognize as myself? That\’s just the beginning and really the easiest part. The struggle is to stay clean and sober and the best way is to get into AA or MA or any program with other recovering addicts. It really really helps. I believe many people are like me (because I know plenty of them) who struggle with a sort of mix of addictions. People don\’t think pot is addictive but when mixed with an addiction to alcohol it can seem like the lesser of the two evils but the result of a wasted life is much the same as other addictions. Although instead of OD\’ing you\’re life just winds down into this blank haze inside your brain. Like I say, I was beginning to think of suicide as the amount of booze I was consuming kept increasing to fully \’wipe my slate\’ each day. In many respects I would say the physical part of the addiction is the simplest part to deal with if more obviously uncomfortable. Luckily the physical withdrawal for pot is not so severe, but still real. And my alcohol withdrawal also was not as severe as dedicated booze hounds (I didn\’t drink much hard booze, a lot of beer and wine topped off with a shot or two to put the icing on the cake, that seemed to make a difference) For me, one led to the other or filled in for the other while I waited to complete the high with both. But I could not control either. That was the hardest part for me to admit to myself. Pot is more insipid in a way because it\’s thought of as a herb, a medicine while booze has an obvious history of wreckage in the world to look at. once you recognize pot as an addictive substance like anything else you can start to spot it\’s victims though. I live in Northern CA and the mystique and quality of weed is legendary with good reason. I hope to never drink or smoke weed again and I keep on the straight and narrow because if I look back on the hollow, shallow, self centered jerk I had become I shudder. I\’ve lost many good friends through these last years as I descended lower; I was not a social alcoholic and basically lost touch and ignored most of my life which I am working to regain through a process of humility and apology and honesty. Also not easy. And I am gaining my self respect and health back through the process and my life feels so much better and my relationships are getting back on track and in focus. I still struggle but I\’m determined not to turn back now I\’ve broken the chains, this time for good. If some of what I say resonates with you then look inside and be honest with yourself and shut out all the idiots who detract and distract you from the process with their put downs for either pot or booze issues. Get some help if you find you can\’t control your habits; there is no shame in asking for help. On the contrary, you will find hope and humility which can lead you back (or perhaps for the first time) to a real simple pure joy. It feels weird at first to say these things about yourself but quickly it becomes a liberating experience. There is a real simple joy in being alive. I had forgotten about it. You can do it too. Oh yes you can! If I can pull out of it, after thirty years slowly spiraling into a haze of despair disguised as enjoyment, you can too. Be honest and seek help if you can\’t do it yourself, you will find the strength in yourself you need with the help of others. Just take that first step…go on…

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  31. WHAT planet are the people on this site from.Has any one ever heard of someone who drinks because they simply enjoy a buzz now and then.Stop taking things so serious and get the stick out of your ass.

  32. how old are u neely

  33. So my fiance and I were forced to move back in with his alcoholic mother after his cancer. It is very hard living with her and having to deal with her episodes. She has been an alocoholic for nearly 10 years now and it shocks me that her family will not try to help. I need some advice. I’ve read up on how you can enable them and how to stop. But our problem is that her home is being foreclosed so my fiance feels if he does not give her money for bills it will be his fault if she looses her home. So is there any kind of REASONABLE advice you can give me as to where to go from here. I would love to help her out but she has been in denial since she started drinking so severely I feel 10 years is quiet enough and something needs to be done I just dont know where to start and I know when I do try to help it will only be my fiance and I helping because the family wants nothing to do with it. So please be compassionate and understanding in your responses. Thank You

  34. a good sign of an alcoholic is easy, if the drinking of that person is affecting the wellbeing or general happyness of them or the people close to them it has become a problem, it is good to remember that it is a drug, a legal drug but a drug all the same and like other drugs it is addictive, and if you abuse the uce of it it can cause a great deal of harm.

  35. hey david neely you are a complete waiste of good oxygen stop uceing ours, are you an idiot or a drug addict drinking is a buzz i agree but we are talking about alcoholism thats where the buzz turns to necessity ok mate, and some people enjoy sliting there wrist’s and liteing houses on fire a buzz, that aent good eather mate, when the buzz hurts others it calld a problem, just like driveing drunk or killing someone. you should really think before you make unconchious remarks by stateing an allthough true but equily erralivant message that doesint help, so just take 2 next time you THINK you are being smart, your really not grow up

  36. Alcoholics are in Denial
    My father is a functioning alcoholic because he will never be in the gutter.

    Alcoholics break promises, dependency on alcoholis is all that matters in the end

    LET GO LET GOD

    LIVE AND LET LIVE

    EASY DOES IT

    Focus on yourself not the alcoholic

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