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Addicted to Nicotine No More

Stop smoking the natural way, without harmful drugs.

Nicotine addiction is defined as the body’s dependency on the presence of nicotine.

A person is psychologically dependent as nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant.

Withdrawal symptoms such as irritability, frustration, headaches, stomach cramps, anger, and anxiety occur when a person refrains from smoking. These symptoms are considered a part of the physical dependency.

I don’t want to get into detail about the ramifications of smoking at this time, as I believe that every single person is aware of the damages smoking causes to the human body. Instead, I would like to concentrate on explaining what happens during the addiction period. This path will then lead us to better understand the healing process.

The market is flooded with all kinds of treatments and medications varying from chewing gum, nicotine patches, to laser treatments. There is also a lot of advice on quitting “cold turkey”, which defines simply stopping the smoking habit. If this method was so simple, there would be no addiction. This method might be suitable for a person who is a few months new to smoking. However, a person who has been smoking for several years could not possibly benefit from this technique. Suddenly eliminating a smoking habit can send a person’s system into shock.

Physical and psychological stress is imposed on the body, of which symptoms I have explained at the beginning of this article. At this stage cigarette craving comes into play and the smoker is back on the addiction track. If you have decided to “kick the habit” you will most likely sign up for some type of treatment and medication whether it be an over the counter product or seeking professional help. In any case if you decide to take chemically based products you will most likely develop a set of whole new symptoms. If you choose to take the natural route, it is important that you understand the role of nicotine in the human body.

A cigarette addiction occurs with Nicotine replacing its opposite molecule Niacin in the brain. Niacin (B3) is found mostly in white bread. This is why people who suddenly stop smoking begin gaining weight. As Nicotine gets depleted from the brain, Niacin comes to displace it. People who stop smoking begin to eat starches which contain Niacin.

Once you have decided to quit smoking, you should steadily adjust to the decrease of nicotine by gradually subtracting your cigarette use. At the same time you should begin an intake of Niacin and Niacinamide*. With an intake of Niacin, you will not develop cravings, thus not gain weight. You may purchase Niacin at your local health store and be sure to follow directions on the label. In addition to Niacin you will benefit from vitamin B15 which will give the body more oxygen and vitamin E which will utilize oxygen in the body. Smokers deplete vitamin C twice as fast as non-smokers, so it is recommended to take vitamin C on a daily basis. Sulfur is especially beneficial to all the female smokers who have depleted it causing their skin, hair, and nails to age faster. Besides the tablet and powder forms, Sulfur is naturally found in turnips, soybeans, onions, garlic, wheat germ, cabbage, eggs, fish, and brussels sprouts.

During your healing process it is a good idea to perspire which will help the body extract some of the poisons ingested through smoking. If you are not physically active, try drinking ginger tea which causes perspiration.

Once you have stopped smoking completely without relapses, you should begin using Goldenseal** herb extract which acts as an expectorant. It will melt the accumulated tar from your lungs. Do not be alarmed when you begin extracting a lot of green and yellow phlegm from the lungs. This is a good sign that the lungs are repairing themselves.

*Use of Niacine can cause a red skin rash and a tingling sensation only for a few minutes. If this bothers you, Niacinamide can be used. Beware that Niacinamide does not have the same structure as Niacine.

** Do not use Goldenseal herb for extended period of time if pregnant or nursing.

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  1. You said:

    “There is also a lot of advice on quitting “cold turkey”, which defines simply stopping the smoking habit. If this method was so simple, there would be no addiction. This method might be suitable for a person who is a few months new to smoking. However, a person who has been smoking for several years could not possibly benefit from this technique. Suddenly eliminating a smoking habit can send a person’s system into shock.”

    With all due respect — In my 48 years, I have known a grand total of TWO — 2! — people who successfully quit smoking. Both were 2-3 pack per day smokers. Both had smoked for DECADES. Both quit “cold turkey.” Both attest that it was not “easy,” but only because it was such an ingrained *habit*, not because of physical complaints.

    I am intrigued by the niacin connection, and am in general sympathetic to “natural” and “nutritional” treatment approaches, but I think some of the rhetoric used in regard to nicotine — including that bit I quoted — is overblown.

  2. Obviously not a smoker

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