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Mephedrone Mayhem

Mephedrone is the drug, blamed for the deaths of two Scunthorpe teenagers, the currently legality of which in the UK is under review. It is a very powerful stimulant and a very popular popular legal high synthesised mainly in south-east Asia.

Mephedrone is the drug, blamed for the deaths of two Scunthorpe teenagers, the currently legality of which in the UK is under review. It is a very powerful stimulant and a very popular popular legal high synthesised mainly in south-east Asia.

With similar effects to amphetamine, ecstasy or cocaine it has become the favourite British clubbers new drug of British clubbers, the demand for it coincided with a sudden scarcity of ecstasy. When, in June 2008, 33 tonnes of sassafras oil – a key ingredient – were seized in Cambodia, supplies were badly affected

It comprises a powder, off-white or yellowish usually snorted but also able to be swallowed, and known variously as Meow, m-Cat, MC, or plant fertiliser, Mephedrone is derived from cathinone extract from the Khat plant, related to amphetamine compounds like ecstasy.  

Mainly sold in one gram bags for £10-£15 online or in person, the drug  is available over the Internet, marketed as plant food, not for human consumption but accompanied by testimonials from so-called gardeners.

Cathinone reportedly produces euphoria and a sense of well-being, users becoming more alert, confident and talkative, though some reported heart palpitations, blurred vision and muscle tension, especially in the jaw and face, and are already listed as class C illegal drugs.

Derivatives, however, are not yet listed under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, making it legal to possess mephedrone. Over the past year, some counties in Europe, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark have made it illegal, and here both head teachers and MPs are pressing for a ban immediately.

Alarmingly, however, new evidence also suggests that 30% of clubbers who use mephedrone exhibit addiction symptoms, meow users had suffering withdrawal effects, failure to live without their fix and the taking of ever larger doses of the drug. Since Home Office figures rank this drug joint second with cocaine, behind cannabis in popularity among 16- to 24-year-olds, the trend is very troubling

Adam Winstock of the King’s College London Institute of Psychiatry, led the new study, interviewing 100 people reporting mephedrone use in a previous survey. 30% of reported being addicted, 34% having major concerns about their drug, 22% claiming strong use urges, and to use it, and 15%  of participants had traces of mephedrone in their urine at the time of the survey.

When it first appeared, people thought mephedrone ecstasy-like, but there is now clear evidence that it is more an amphetamine, so dependency, re-dosing and compulsion to use should come as no surprise.

Such symptoms lead to users not sleeping or eating enough, losing touch with reality, becoming paranoid and ultimately falling into mental health problems as the drugs wreak havoc with their minds. This is no harmless bit of recreational fun, so do yourself a favour and steer well clear.

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  1. hey…nice to find that out!i like your shares

  2. Well researched and very educational.
    I hope this article helps someone.

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