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Red Blood Cells Excreted in The Urine

Medically known as hematuria, red blood cells (RBC) in urine is considered normal if blood cells are less numerous. Typically, about 2.5 million red blood cells are excreted in the urine each day through the normal process in the body to get rid of old, inefficient red blood cells red. There are two main types of hematuria, microscopic and macroscopic haematuria. Microscopic hematuria is a condition where an abnormal amount of red blood cells are present in the urine, which is not visible to the naked eye and can not be examined under a microscope. In gross hematuria or gross, number of red blood cells is sufficient to change the color of urine yellow to pink or red.

Medically known as hematuria, red blood cells (RBC) in urine is considered normal if blood cells are less numerous.  Typically, about 2.5 million red blood cells are excreted in the urine each day through the normal process in the body to get rid of old, inefficient red blood cells red.  There are two main types of hematuria, microscopic and macroscopic haematuria.  Microscopic hematuria is a condition where an abnormal amount of red blood cells are present in the urine, which is not visible to the naked eye and can not be examined under a microscope.  In gross hematuria or gross, number of red blood cells is sufficient to change the color of urine yellow to pink or red.

Causes of red blood cells in urine
Although not a health threat to the syndrome of life, there are several factors that contribute to red blood cells in urine, as explained below.

Urinary tract infections: urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common cause of red blood cells in urine.  This is due to bacterial invasion of the urinary tract that can cause tissue damage, which may eventually spread to the urethra, bladder and kidneys, sometimes.
* Kidney stones: Over time, kidneys and other parts of the urinary tract is blocked by stones, tumors or inflammation, leading to a narrowing of the opening.  Kidney stones are small deposits of chemicals, calcium, phosphate and oxalate.  The cut can cause pain and discomfort during urination and can also cause blood in urine.
* Drugs: The consumption of prescription drugs as quinine, rifampicin, warfarin, aspirin, phenytoin, etc. can help relieve the symptoms of an existing disease, but can cause harmful side effects, such as red blood in the urine.
* Diseases: There are several diseases that can contribute to blood in the urine, such as diabetes, a disease that affects the secretion of the hormone insulin in the pancreas, and can also inflame the blood vessels in the kidneys responsible for filtering blood.  Similarly, sickle cell anemia, a genetic blood disorder that can cause red blood cells in urine.  This is due to the presence of an abnormal form of hemoglobin (the molecule in red blood cells) or lack of red blood cells in the body.
* The enlarged prostate enlarged prostate or benign prostatic hypertrophy, which are often found in older men may be another cause of blood in the urine.  It is a condition of non-cancerous prostate, where there is abnormal cell divisions that lead to the gradual enlargement of the prostate gland.
* Other factors: kidney infection, vigorous exercise, an accident or trauma that causes kidney bruising or damage to the bladder can also cause a high number of red blood cells in urine.

Symptoms of red blood cells in urine
Here are some other symptoms, and blood in the urine that the patient may experience hematuria.

* Small blood clots in urine
* Pain in the flank (side of body between ribs and hips) or groin
* Burning or painful urination
* Nausea or vomiting
* Decreased appetite
* Weight Loss

Treatment of red blood cells in urine
Treatment of hematuria depends mainly on the underlying cause.  Urinalysis, blood tests and an ultrasound of the kidneys or cystoscopy are no diagnostic tests that are performed to discover the real reason behind the red blood cells in urine.  If blood in the urine due to kidney stones, patients should drink NOK and can take any medications for pain relief.  For a urinary tract infection or kidney infection, patients may receive antibiotics, but only under the supervision of a physician.  Similarly, if a substance causes haematuria should be interrupted or the dose can be reduced, but on the recommendation of a physician.

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