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Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (Pcos)

Awareness on Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

What is PCOS?

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a most common hormonal disorder in women’s now a day, also called Stein-Leventhal syndrome, affects an estimated five to ten percent of women of childbearing age. Women develop polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) when they have too many male hormones and not enough female hormones, making ovulation rare or irregular. Normally a woman ovulates when an egg-containing follicle grows and releases a mature egg. Polycystic ovarian syndrome keeps those follicles from growing, causing them to build up in the ovaries and form small benign estrogen-releasing cysts. The combination of the estrogen and the male hormones throws the production of two other hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), which also helps inhibit ovulation, off balance. Without ovulation, male hormone levels remain high, and the cycle repeats itself.

Problems occur due to PCOS

Irregular or nonexistent periods (often beginning three to four years after the first menstruation).Very light or very heavy bleeding during your period, Acne, Difficulty conceiving.

How can I take care of myself?

Your doctor will want to regularly monitor any changes in your ovaries or uterine wall caused by irregular bleeding. She may also want to test your blood intermittently to keep track of hormonal changes. Yearly pelvic exams are also important. They can detect early signs of ovarian and uterine cancer, which are a risk for women who menstruate irregularly or not at all. (You can limit your risk of uterine cancer by regulating your cycle with birth control pills or progesterone pills.)And, if you’re overweight, try to lose weight by eating a well-balanced diet and exercising. If you’re insulin-resistant, exercising will help your body process insulin and decrease your risk of developing diabetes. It will also increase your chance of responding to fertility drugs.

What to Avoid and how to improve diet?

If your eating habits leave something to be desired — and many people’s do — you’ll have to make some adjustments. Some solid advice: Cut out or only occasionally drinks alcohol. (For non-alcoholic alternatives, see our list of the best virgin drinks). Stop using recreational drugs and, if you smoke, quit. All of these substances and habits can harm a developing fetus. You may also want to cut back on caffeine. The research on whether caffeine can affect fertility is mixed. Experts generally agree that low to moderate caffeine consumption, less than 300 mg a day or about the equivalent of two 8 ounce cups of coffee, won’t affect your fertility, you’re your healthcare provider may recommend that you cut caffeine out entirely to play it safe. Learn more about caffeine and fertility. Although fish is generally very healthy, certain types are high in mercury, which can be dangerous to your unborn baby. Because mercury can accumulate in your body and linger there for more than a year, it’s best to avoid high-mercury fish such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish while you’re trying to conceive. Instead, eat lower-mercury fish such as salmon and canned light tuna (not albacore, which is higher in mercury) once or twice a week. Read more on eating fish while trying to conceive. Processed meats should be consumed in small amounts, and smoked or raw meats should be avoided entirely during pregnancy. Even hot dogs or deli meats should be heated until they are steaming before you eat them if you are pregnant. Take a vitamin-mineral supplement. Get lots of folic acid — at least 400 micrograms a day. Find your ideal body weight. Now a days different types of BMI calculators are available which can be brought into consideration to calculate the weight.

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